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Morocco - North and East

Ever-changing scenery and lots to learn and like

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Morocco – North and East

Thursday-Friday

We were met at Tangier airport on Thursday by our guide Kamal who speaks Berber, Arabic, French and English and driver Mohamed, in a Landcruiser.

Kamal (guide) and Mohamed (driver - in Berber regalia)

Kamal (guide) and Mohamed (driver - in Berber regalia)


After a quick stop at the cave of Hercules (reputedly where the great man rested between a couple of his labours) we were on our way to Chefchaouen, a three hour drive away. On the way to Chefchaouen, Kamal filled us in on the people of Morocco. Population is 37.5 million of which it appears about 80% are of mixed Berber descent, the remainder are of Arab descent with a small number of Jews and West Africans. Driver Mohamed is Berber and Kamal is of mixed Berber descent. The King of Morocco is Arab (the line stretches back centuries) and we certainly get the feeling that the Berber people feel this is not as it should be. The South of Morocco is mainly Berber.

Our hotel in Chefchaouen is really lovely and hurrah! a swimming pool! We arrived early evening and have two nights in Chefchaouen giving us a full day to explore the town. Dinner was excellent, accompanied by Moroccan Champagne – a.k.a. sparkling mineral water! ;-) No alcohol is available in the hotel, however you’re allowed to bring your own wine providing you clear it first with the manager.

Bedroom into sitting room - Chefchauen

Bedroom into sitting room - Chefchauen


Pool area - Chefchauen - very welcome pool on a 30C  day

Pool area - Chefchauen - very welcome pool on a 30C+ day

View above pool area - Chefchauen - Rif mountain foothills in background

View above pool area - Chefchauen - Rif mountain foothills in background


Chefchaouen is situated beneath the peaks of the Rif mountains and is one of the prettiest towns in Morocco. It is a mountain village with many buildings blue-washed and is referred to as “The Blue City”. There are numerous explanations as to why Chefchaouen is predominantly blue, and this depends on who you ask. Walking around the Medina (old city) was very pleasant and not too busy and we found the people very polite. One could browse in the tiny shops and there was no pressure to make a purchase.

Chefchauen city

Chefchauen city

Chefchauen

Chefchauen

Chefchauen

Chefchauen

Chefchauen - early morning scene

Chefchauen - early morning scene

Chefchauen

Chefchauen

Chefchauen medina

Chefchauen medina

Chefchauen medina

Chefchauen medina

Chefchauen medina

Chefchauen medina

Never out of a job in Chefchauen - the man with blue paint and a paintbrush

Never out of a job in Chefchauen - the man with blue paint and a paintbrush


En-route from Tangier we were impressed to see hundreds of wind turbines along the hilltops - the Tangier region being permanently windy. Kamal told us a large solar farm is currently under construction, and this will export power to Europe in 2024. Morocco’s main exports are fish, olive oil, dates, oranges, apples, a variety of other fruits, and tourism is big.

Saturday.

Kamal and Mohamed arrived promptly at 8.00 am as today we head to the city of Fez (Fes), stopping at the UNESCO-listed World Heritage Roman ruin site of Volubilis - the most important historical Roman site in Morocco. A guide took us around Volubilis and it certainly was well worth visiting. The Romans established a prosperous town, built some big homes and civic buildings, brought in many slaves and lived very well in the fertile area. Many of the foundations are still visible and we could get a very good indication of the way the city was laid out.

Volubilis Roman City ruins

Volubilis Roman City ruins

Volubilis

Volubilis

We arrived in in the Arab city of Fez early afternoon. We had been told Fez is the spiritual and cultural heart of Morocco. We checked into our hotel where Ahmed, our guide for the afternoon was waiting. Before going to the Medina we visited a ceramics factory where everything is handmade, using only the finest ‘grey volcanic’ clay – reputedly a very strong material. The potter and the artists are masters of their craft. It is also a school for potters and artists. They produce hand-painted ceramics and mosaic tables and other artworks. We were particularly impressed with the ceramics .

Potter - 25 years on the job - very quick to produce items - a perfect mini-tagine in 2 minutes

Potter - 25 years on the job - very quick to produce items - a perfect mini-tagine in 2 minutes

Hand painted ceramics before glazing (lilac will become blue)

Hand painted ceramics before glazing (lilac will become blue)

Mosaic artist workin on a mirror surround - Fez (tabletop in background looked great)

Mosaic artist workin on a mirror surround - Fez (tabletop in background looked great)

Ceramic output

Ceramic output

Ceramic products

Ceramic products

When we arrived at the Medina, Ahmed gave us our standing orders of “do’s and dont’s” and we followed him closely as we did not want to get lost in the Medina which resembles a rabbit warren. The circumference of the Medina is 30 km and apparently is the mother of all Medinas, with 420 mosques in the Medina alone. The Imams and Muzzeins are paid by the government and are well paid according to Kamal. There was just about anything and everything being sold.

Ahmed and Glyn in Fez medina

Ahmed and Glyn in Fez medina

Fez medina

Fez medina

Dinner? Fez medina

Dinner? Fez medina


Fez city (note thouands of satellite dishes)

Fez city (note thouands of satellite dishes)

The only way to transport goods inside the Medina is by donkey, mule or hand cart.

Only forms of transport permitted in Fez medina - mule and handcart

Only forms of transport permitted in Fez medina - mule and handcart

We found Fez far too busy and “scruffy”. One night was plenty for our liking despite lovely accommodation.
Riad (Hotel) bedroom - Fez

Riad (Hotel) bedroom - Fez

Riad sitting room area of bedroom - Fez

Riad sitting room area of bedroom - Fez

Hookah smoking alcove - Riad in Fez

Hookah smoking alcove - Riad in Fez

Sunday

Today we knew it was going to be a long driving day as we were headed to Merzouga on the edge of the Sahara desert. It was an eight hour drive which included morning tea in Ifran (nicknamed as a little Switzerland as it is a ski resort in winter and has steeply sloping roofs to boot) and lunch somewhere along the road. It was a very scenic drive through parts of the Atlas Mountains and the date growing area; all very lovely.

Looked like it might not be quite street legal

Looked like it might not be quite street legal

Nomad temporary home for six summer months before migrating to desert for six winter months (note stock pen on right)

Nomad temporary home for six summer months before migrating to desert for six winter months (note stock pen on right)

We arrived at Merzouga at 4.30pm and boarded our next mode of transport – camels - as we were to spend a night in a desert camp.

About to be camel riders

About to be camel riders

Looking good but not comfortable

Looking good but not comfortable


The camel ride took about an hour and fifteen minutes. Our luggage was delivered to camp in a 4x4 and arrived shortly after us. Needless to say a shower was on the cards! Fortunately our Berber tent had an en-suite (so not quite the original Berber tent). The four course dinner was served outside, before we joined other folk, on a different tour, in an adjoining camp for Berber drumming around the fire, where Glyn joined in the dancing.

Drummers (and waiters) at Desert Camp

Drummers (and waiters) at Desert Camp

Party girl!

Party girl!

After breakfast we were back on our camels at 7.45 am for the return journey where Kamal and Mohamed were waiting. Our destination was Todgha (Todra) Gorges, but we were keen to stop at Erfoud, which is well known for fossil quarries which are a major industry in Erfoud. This comes about as 350 million years ago, when there was a single landmass – Pangea - the region around what is now Erfoud was part of the sea, and there are huge deposits of prehistoric sea creatures. Our visit to one of the fossil operations was very informative and we now have a little extra weight to pack in Ivor’s suitcase.

Fossil before cutting and polishing

Fossil before cutting and polishing

Cut and polished fossil

Cut and polished fossil

Sedementary material removed to expose fossils - then sanded and polished - looked lovely

Sedementary material removed to expose fossils - then sanded and polished - looked lovely

We arrived at Todgha Gorge early afternoon and walked through the canyons with walls towering 300 metres above us. The walls are so high that taking photographs from down below does not do justice.

Todra Gorge

Todra Gorge

Todra Gorge

Todra Gorge

Todra Gorge

Todra Gorge


Before arriving at the gorge we stopped at a shop in a small Berber village, and unbeknown to us, the stop was to dress us in Berber clothing for a photo with the Berber flag.

Citizenship ceremony? Flag is: Blue for sky; Green for forests; Yellow for desert; Berber letter Z standing for patriotism (in blood red)

Citizenship ceremony? Flag is: Blue for sky; Green for forests; Yellow for desert; Berber letter Z standing for patriotism (in blood red)


Again our hotel is excellent and we have been spoilt. We have had a few big days so dinner and a comfortable bed are most welcome.

Posted by IvorGlyn 14:40 Archived in Morocco

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Comments

Morocco looks very colourful and interesting. It’s particularly interesting for the future travellers amongst us! 😃

by Janet

Looks a fascinating place & so ancient. You don't comment on how you felt after quite a decent camel ride into the desert so you not only looked the part you felt it too. Well done. It is good to see you relaxing a little although I see there is no time to fall in a heap after your marathon walk. Keep up with the facts, all so interesting.

by Brenda

Go on, Glyn, buy it!

by Debra Marshall

More fascinating experiences for the intrepid travellers. Loved the ceramics and the polished fossils, also the "dress ups". You make a fine looking Berber couple. Wonderfully diverse cultural experiences to savour.

by Ken & Bev

The ceramics are amazing and the Todra Gorge looks brilliant. What's the preference, travel by shank's pony or the camel?

by David

Love the sheik and desert queen!

by Heather

To answer David's Q: uphill on camel, downhill on foot. Like horseriding, downhill is jarring and one tends to slide forward, crushingly!

by IvorGlyn

What a unique place. Glad to see you are letting your hair down with your new outfits, interesting mode of transport and Glynis shaking her booty on the dance floor. xox

by Maree

Scenery looks great, the pools looked inviting, ceramics interesting, fossils OK, I can see Ivor as Peter O'tools replacement in the remake.
take care

by Irene

I did make a comment on this wonderful episode but it seems to have got lost. Anyway, how fantastic, having your own driver and guide enables you to see more of the "real" life. Love the Blue City, can hardly wait to experience it. Love your rather fetching outfits and the camel riding photo was great. X

by Arlis

We expect to see the blue turbans being worn during our Melbourne summer. No need to bring the camels!

by Sebert & Sofie

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